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James Balog, The Human Element: A Film Screening and Discussion

Code:
EVT 592
Day:
Wednesday
Date(s):
May 1
Time:
7:30 pm
Location:
Cubberley Auditorium, School of Education
Cost:
FREE
Additional Info:
This event has a different date than what appears in the print catalogue. The event will now take place on Wednesday, May 1.
Status: No Registration Required
For over forty years, renowned photographer James Balog has been exploring the troubled relationship between human beings and nature. In films and photographic projects on polar ice, old-growth forests, and endangered animals, Balog uses his camera to help us understand the “Anthropocene”—the geologic epoch in which we live, defined by the historically unprecedented ability of humans to alter the planet’s environment. Balog is best known for his dramatic work on the impact of climate change on the earth’s glaciers. In his film Chasing Ice, the NOVA documentary Extreme Ice, and his ambitious years-long research project, the Extreme Ice Survey, Balog has accumulated persuasive and alarming evidence that we are losing thousands of cubic miles of ice that keep the earth’s climate habitable.

In his new film, The Human Element, Balog follows the four classical elements—air, earth, fire, and water—to frame his journey, exploring wildfires, hurricanes, sea level rise, coal mining, and the changes in the air we breathe. With compassion and heart, The Human Element tells an urgent story while giving inspiration for a more balanced relationship between humanity and nature. Following the film screening will be a special post-film discussion with James Balog.


James Balog, Photographer; Founder, Extreme Ice Survey

Over the four decades of his artistic career, James Balog has broken new conceptual and artistic ground on one of the most important issues of our era: human modification of nature. His work has appeared in National Geographic, The New Yorker, Life, Vanity Fair, The New York Times Magazine, Smithsonian, Audubon, and Outside. He has received dozens of awards, and is the author of seven books.

This program is co-sponsored by Stanford Continuing Studies and Planet Earth Arts @ Stanford.

Primary Event Organizer: Continuing Studies
Parking Suggestions: The Oval (Palm Drive); Lasuen Street, Roth Way, Tresidder Union Lot
Book Sales/Book Signing: No
Audio/Video Recording: TBA
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