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HIS 165 — Eleanor Roosevelt and Her World

Quarter: Summer
Instructor(s): Margo Horn
Duration: 5 weeks
Format/Location: On-campus
Date(s): Jun 26—Jul 24
Class Recording Available: No
Class Meeting Day: Wednesdays
Grade Restriction: No letter grade
Class Meeting Time: 7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Tuition: $360
   
Refund Deadline: Jun 28
 
Unit(s): 1
   
Status: Open
 
Quarter: Summer
Day: Wednesdays
Duration: 5 weeks
Time: 7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Date(s): Jun 26—Jul 24
Unit(s): 1
Format/Location: On-campus
 
Tuition: $360
 
Refund Deadline: Jun 28
 
Instructor(s): Margo Horn
 
Grade Restriction: No letter grade
 
Recording Available: No
 
Status: Open
 
Eleanor Roosevelt’s life illuminates major events in 20th-century US history. Born in 1884, she watched America endure World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, and eventually, the Cold War. These were transformational moments for the nation, and within these moments, Eleanor Roosevelt was herself a transformational figure. She redefined the role of First Lady and was a tireless advocate for social welfare and human rights. For example, she actively supported Marian Anderson’s singing at the Lincoln Memorial in 1939, after the Daughters of the American Revolution refused to let Anderson, an African American, sing before an integrated audience at Constitution Hall. She also helped win passage of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. In this course, we will take a close look at Eleanor Roosevelt’s personal life, her influence on FDR’s presidency, the friends and intellectuals she is associated with, and her many achievements, while keeping an eye on the watershed events that redefined our nation. Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Pulitzer Prize–winning book, No Ordinary Time, will be the central text for the course.

MARGO HORN
Former Lecturer, Department of History, Stanford

Margo Horn specializes in the history of women, the history of family, and the social history of medicine and psychiatry. Her research concerns the history of women physicians in the US, the history of single women in 20th-century America, and the history of women and mental illness in America during the same period. She is the author of Before It's Too Late: The Child Guidance Movement in the United States, 1922–1945. She received an MA and a PhD from Tufts.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Doris Kearns Goodwin , No Ordinary Time: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt: The Home Front in World War II (ISBN 978-0684804484 )