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Spring Quarter

Spring Registration Now Open
Most Classes Begin Apr 03
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STANFORD CONTINUING STUDIES COURSES ELIGIBLE FOR BEWELL BERRY


This Spring, select Continuing Studies courses will be Berry-eligible for employees participating in Stanford’s BeWell program.
 
**In order to receive a Berry, students must take the course for Credit or a Letter grade.** Students will be asked to choose the credit option during the registration process. The Continuing Studies program will report student attendance to the BeWell office at the conclusion of the quarter. And, as always, all Continuing Studies courses are STAP-fund eligible.
Spring courses that are Berry-eligible include: 

Course: Nutrition: An Eminently Sensible Introduction (SCI 12)
Instructor: Clyde Wilson, Research Associate, Biochemistry, UCSF
Schedule: 8 weeks, April 5—June 7, 2 units, $435
Format: On-campus course

Good nutrition sounds simple: Eat a variety of wholesome foods and drink some water. But in our modern environment, we are surrounded by food options very different from those on a traditional farm. Low-calorie sweeteners, plant extracts, omega-3 fatty acids, and any number of additives vie for our attention, all claiming to be the key to improved health. The various fad diets claim the same thing, many offering very different approaches to eating. How can we find out what will really help us feel better and live longer? How can we survive a trip to the grocery store or our own kitchen? By surveying the scientific literature relevant to modern nutrition, we will develop a systematic approach to creating recipes and grocery lists of foods. Nutrition for general health, disease prevention, and exercise performance will be contrasted throughout the course.

No scientific background is required; however, this course is based on in-depth examination and discussion of scientific findings relevant to the course topic, with homework focused on application.

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.


Learn more > https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/liberal-arts-and-sciences/nutrition-an-eminently-sensible-introduction/20163_SCI-12


Course: Inflammation and Disease (BIO 04 W)
Instructor: Tobi Schmidt, Immunotherapy Researcher, Personal Health Advisor
Schedule: 5 weeks, April 3—May 5, 1 unit, $325
Format: Online course

Inflammation is a double-edged sword. It is required to protect the body, but too much of it can create disease. Diabetes, cancer, depression and stroke are just a few of the diseases associated with chronic inflammation. How can something that protects us from infection and helps us to repair and restore the body also be so bad for us?

Chronic inflammation is associated with lifestyle factors like obesity, diet, exercise, sleep habits, and stress levels. However, the root cause can be attributed to the impact of these factors at a cellular and a molecular level. An intimate and complex network of communication is constantly taking place in our bodies, and our immune system is at the center of this network. Signals about what we eat, how much we weigh, and how much we exercise are all communicated through our immune system and impact our levels of inflammation. In this online course, we will take a closer look at how our lifestyle choices affect our health through inflammation and investigate the cellular events orchestrating our healthy and unhealthy states.

This is an online course. While necessarily structured differently from an on-campus classroom course, this course maintains a similar level of instructor engagement through videos, interactive exercises, and discussion with fellow students, as well as optional online video conferencing sessions. 

Learn more > https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/liberal-arts-and-sciences/inflammation-and-disease/20163_BIO-04-W

Course: The Upside of Stress (PSY 39 W)
Instructor: Kelly McGonigal, Lecturer, Stanford Graduate School of Business
Schedule: 6 weeks, April 17—May 26, 1 unit, $375
Format: Online course

Stress is unavoidable. But is it always harmful? The latest science offers a surprising new view of stress—one that reveals how stress can enhance well-being, support personal growth, and increase resilience. The research also shows that how we think about and react to stress influences how it affects us. This course will explore what makes stress good for you and what you can do to get good at stress. You will learn how to cultivate a mindset that helps you thrive under stress, as well as practical strategies for transforming the biology of your stress response in order to improve health and well-being. We will look at how to embrace anxiety, transform adversity into meaning, and use stress as a catalyst for social connection. The science and personal applications that we cover will give you a renewed sense of optimism about your own ability to handle whatever challenges life brings.

This is an online course. While necessarily structured differently from an on-campus classroom course, this course maintains a similar level of instructor engagement through videos, interactive exercises, and discussion with fellow students, as well as optional online video conferencing sessions.

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.

Learn more > https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/liberal-arts-and-sciences/the-upside-of-stress/20163_PSY-39-W

Course: The Psychology of Guilt (PSY 17)
Instructor: Herant Katchadourian, Professor of Psychiatry and Human Biology, Emeritus, Stanford; Former President, Flora Family Foundation
Schedule: 5 weeks, April 6—May 4, 1 unit, $240
Format: On-campus course

Many of us are ambivalent about guilt. We recognize the need for it but would rather not experience it. However, guilt is an integral part of our lives, and we need to understand it in order to deal with it effectively.

This course will address such questions as: What is guilt? How does it differ from shame or regret? What functions does it serve? What are its cultural and gender differences? And is the capacity for guilt part of our evolutionary heritage, or is it socially constructed? We will look at behaviors that typically induce guilt, the role of guilt in the family and intimate relationships, healthy and unhealthy forms of guilt, and feelings of guilt when one has done no wrong. Finally, we will address the issue of how to deal with guilt—both as we experience it ourselves and as we induce it in others.

This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.

Learn more > https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/liberal-arts-and-sciences/the-psychology-of-guilt/20163_PSY-17

Course: Choosing Happiness (PDV 83)
Instructor: Laura Delizonna, Chief Learning Officer, Wisdom Labs
Schedule: 4 weeks, April 12—May 3, 1 unit, $245
Format: On-campus course

Happy people do not just feel better—they do better than less happy individuals. Research shows they achieve greater success and wealth, are healthier, are more altruistic, and have more satisfying relationships. The keys to happiness are within everyone’s reach— because the keys are actually habits. In this course, students will learn happiness-enhancing habits that will help them improve responses to stress and opportunities at work, at home, and in relationships. The tools presented are derived from research in the innovative eld of positive psychology, the science of well-being. The course text will be Thrive: Self-Coaching for Happiness and Success, a workbook that was written for this course and includes summaries of scientific findings, worksheets, and practical exercises. Students will apply these principles to their daily personal and professional lives and engage in class discussions, meditations, and other experiential exercises. 

Learn more > https://continuingstudies.stanford.edu/courses/professional-and-personal-development/choosing-happiness/20163_PDV-83

For more information about Stanford's BeWell program, please visit: https://bewell.stanford.edu/