War and Peace" /> <span>Tolstoy's <span style="font-style:italic">War and Peace</span></span> fullscreen background
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LIT 193 — Tolstoy's War and Peace

Quarter: Winter
Day(s): Tuesdays
Course Format: Live Online (About Formats)
Duration: 10 weeks
Date(s): Jan 12—Mar 16
Time: 7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Drop Deadline: Jan 14
Units: 2
Tuition: $485
Instructor(s): Anne Hruska
Status: Registration opens Nov 30, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: Some of our refund deadlines have changed. See this course's drop deadline above and click here for the full policy.
Winter
Live Online(About Formats)
Tuesdays
7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Date(s)
Jan 12—Mar 16
10 weeks
Drop By
Jan 14
2 Units
Fees
$485
Instructor(s):
Anne Hruska
Registration opens Nov 30, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: Some of our refund deadlines have changed. See this course's drop deadline above and click here for the full policy.
War and Peace is a novel exploring the question of how one can live through a time of national crisis. Set in the early 19th century, War and Peace depicts Napoleon’s invasion of Russia, and the suffering and upheaval that come as a result. With characters who feel like living people, and a plot that encompasses everything from aristocratic manners to guerrilla warfare, it is a novel of exhilarating scope—not just in its length, but also how its fully believable characters, whom we come to know and care about, are connected to the question of how to understand history and our own place in it. Pierre Bezukhov is an illegitimate son with radical convictions and no idea of how to behave in a drawing room; Natasha Rostova bounds joyfully through every day and seems to be born only for happiness; the proud, high-minded Prince Andrei lives in a kind of estrangement from those around him; his sister, Princess Maria, is trapped in a suffocating life she can’t escape. Details of their everyday lives, romantic longings, and marital disasters unfold amid the national emergency of invasion and war. We will read War and Peace in the context of its times, exploring in particular its philosophical, political, and historical background, as well as its artistic structure.

Anne Hruska, English and Russian Literature Instructor, Stanford Online High School

Anne Hruska’s research focuses on the intersection between the political and the emotional in 19th-century Russian prose. She has been a fellow in the Introduction to the Humanities program at Stanford; she has also taught at UC Berkeley and the University of Missouri. Hruska received a PhD from UC Berkeley.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace (Pevear and Volokhonsky Translation Recommended)
DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)