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ARC 45 — The World’s Greatest Archaeological Sites: From Pompeii to Machu Picchu

Quarter: Winter
Day(s): Wednesdays
Course Format: On-campus course
Duration: 8 weeks
Date(s): Jan 17—Mar 7
Time: 7:00—9:05 pm
Drop Deadline: Jan 30
Units: 2
Tuition: $460
Instructor(s): Patrick Hunt
Status: Registration opens on 12/04/2017
Please Note: This course has a different schedule than what appears in the print catalogue. The course will meet over 8 Wednesdays, 1/17-3/7, from 7-9:05 pm. There's also a class tour of the Cantor Arts Center collections on Sat., 2/24 & Sun., 2/25, from 2-4 pm.
Winter
On-campus course
Wednesdays
7:00—9:05 pm
Date(s)
Jan 17—Mar 7
8 weeks
Drop By
Jan 30
2 Units
Fees
$460
Instructor(s):
Patrick Hunt
Registration opens on 12/04/2017
Please Note: This course has a different schedule than what appears in the print catalogue. The course will meet over 8 Wednesdays, 1/17-3/7, from 7-9:05 pm. There's also a class tour of the Cantor Arts Center collections on Sat., 2/24 & Sun., 2/25, from 2-4 pm.
What are the world’s greatest archaeology sites and why? What makes a world archaeology site historically important? How have archaeology and our understanding of history changed as a result of these vital sites? Can we create an impact scale of an indisputable top ten sites and discoveries? Global archaeologists tend to agree on the importance of these key sites: Roman Pompeii and the city of Rome itself; Greek Athens and Olympia; Egyptian Karnak-Luxor and nearby Kings Valley; Olduvai Gorge and Rift Valley Africa; Xi’an in China; Nineveh in Iraq; Machu Picchu in Peru; Akrotiri in Thera-Santorini; Minoan Knossos in Crete; Lascaux Cave in France; Teotihuacan in Mexico; Jerusalem and Masada in Israel; Troy in Turkey; Tikal in Guatemala; Harappa and Mohenjo-daro in Pakistan; Petra in Jordan; Angkor Wat in Cambodia; and even the high-altitude find spot of the ice mummy Ötzi the Iceman in the Ötztal Alps.

In this course, we will explore these great archaeology sites and their impact. Drawing on maps, images, and notable material artifacts, students will come to appreciate why these sites deserve to be called the world’s most important archaeology sites.

Patrick Hunt, Former Director, Stanford Alpine Archaeology Project

Patrick Hunt has taught at Stanford since 1993. He is the author of twenty books, including Caravaggio (Life & Times), Ten Discoveries That Rewrote History, When Empires Clash, and Hannibal. He is an associate at the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and a research associate in archeoethnobotany at the Institute for EthnoMedicine. Hunt’s archaeology research has been sponsored by the National Geographic Society. He received a PhD from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.