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FLM 115 — The New Hollywood: The Revolution in American Cinema, 1966–1976

Quarter: Fall
Day(s): Tuesdays
Course Format: On campus
Duration: 10 weeks
Date(s): Sep 27—Dec 13
Time: 6:30—9:00 pm
Drop Deadline: Oct 10
Unit(s): 2 Units
Tuition: $435
Status: Open
Please Note: This course has a different schedule than what appears in the print catalogue. The course will meet over 10 Tuesdays, September 27 - December 13. There will be no class on November 8 and November 22.
Fall
On campus
Tuesdays
6:30—9:00 pm
Date(s)
Sep 27—Dec 13
10 weeks
Drop By
Oct 10
2 Units
Fees
$435
Open
Please Note: This course has a different schedule than what appears in the print catalogue. The course will meet over 10 Tuesdays, September 27 - December 13. There will be no class on November 8 and November 22.
After thirty years of strict enforcement of the Motion Picture Production Code, Hollywood finally, in the mid-1960s, triumphantly smashed the shackles of censorship and proudly proclaimed its independence from the puritanical constraints that defined the very nature of commercial American moviemaking. With films like The Graduate, Easy Rider, and Midnight Cowboy, Hollywood at long last began to embrace images and ideas that had formerly been considered strictly off-limits. Provocative subject matter, coarse language, a preoccupation with violence, and increasingly graphic sexual content soon became commonplace as domestic films exploded with fresh urgency across movie screens.

Filmmakers like Mike Nichols, Robert Altman, William Friedkin, Martin Scorsese, and Brian DePalma helped reinvent American cinema during this period and were now the ruling members of the New Hollywood. This intense survey of American films produced from the mid-60s to the mid-70s will help create a fascinating chronology of Hollywood cinema and its sudden, rapid evolution. Ten full-length films (including Easy Rider, Midnight Cowboy, and The French Connection) will provide the vivid backdrop for this highly stimulating course.

Elliot Lavine, Film Programmer

Elliot Lavine has been programming films in the Bay Area since 1990, including his annual film noir festival, “I Wake Up Dreaming.” In 2010, he received the Marlon Riggs Award from the San Francisco Film Critics Circle for his revival of rare archival titles and his role in the renewed popularity of film noir.

Textbooks for this course:

No required textbooks