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GEOG 07 A — The History and Geography of Current Global Events

Quarter: Fall
Day(s): Tuesdays
Course Format: Live Online (About Formats)
Duration: 10 weeks
Date(s): Sep 27—Dec 6
Time: 7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Refund Deadline: Sep 29
Units: 2
Grade Restriction: No letter grade
Tuition: $520
Instructor(s): Martin Lewis
Class Recording Available: Yes
Status: Registration opens Aug 22, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: Optional Q&A Session: Tuesday, December 13, 7:00 - 8:50 pm (PT). No class on November 22
DOWNLOAD THE SYLLABUS » (subject to change)
Fall
Live Online(About Formats)
Tuesdays
7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Date(s)
Sep 27—Dec 6
10 weeks
Refund Date
Sep 29
2 Units
Fees
$520
Grade Restriction
No letter grade
Instructor(s):
Martin Lewis
Recording
Yes
Registration opens Aug 22, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: Optional Q&A Session: Tuesday, December 13, 7:00 - 8:50 pm (PT). No class on November 22
DOWNLOAD THE SYLLABUS » (subject to change)
While global news accounts focus on current events, the geographical and historical contexts necessary for comprehending what is occurring are seldom provided. News stories on the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, for example, do not have room to adequately describe the cultural similarities and differences between the two countries or to outline their historical connections and divergences. Nor are they able to delve into the theories of history and geography that inform the worldview of Vladimir Putin and his advisors, or to analyze the complex development of Ukrainian national consciousness. This course aims to provide the deep background necessary to make sense of such momentous developments.

This course will examine the geographical and historical contexts of many breaking international events. The topics covered will vary in accordance with newsworthy developments occurring during the autumn of 2022. Most of these topics will be covered extensively by the American press, but others will be much less familiar, covered mostly by local news agencies. Lectures will be structured partly around the explication of maps, ranging from historical maps to cultural maps to Google Earth images. We will examine these cartographic products with a critical eye, focusing not only on what they reveal but also on what they obscure and how they can encode ideologically charged perspectives.

MARTIN LEWIS
Senior Lecturer in International History, Stanford

Martin Lewis is the author or coauthor of five books, including The Myth of Continents: A Critique of Metageography and Globalization and Diversity: Geography of a Changing World. He received a PhD in geography from UC Berkeley.

Textbooks for this course:

There are no required textbooks; however, some fee-based online readings may be assigned.