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FLM 141 — The Great Film Movements: Five Waves in Ten Weeks

Quarter: Winter
Day(s): Thursdays
Course Format: Live Online (About Formats)
Duration: 10 weeks
Date(s): Jan 14—Mar 18
Time: 7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Drop Deadline: Jan 16
Units: 2
Grade Restriction: No letter grade
Tuition: $435
Instructor(s): Mick LaSalle
Status: Registration opens Nov 30, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: Some of our refund deadlines have changed. See this course's drop deadline above and click here for the full policy.
Winter
Live Online(About Formats)
Thursdays
7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Date(s)
Jan 14—Mar 18
10 weeks
Drop By
Jan 16
2 Units
Fees
$435
Grade Restriction
No letter grade
Instructor(s):
Mick LaSalle
Registration opens Nov 30, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: Some of our refund deadlines have changed. See this course's drop deadline above and click here for the full policy.
Progress in moviemaking often comes in huge, exciting waves of sudden development that harness an era's promise and translate it into art. These waves change everything in their path. Sometimes they are driven by technology, at other times by economics, world events, or changes in social mores. In this course, we will delve into five of these waves, or film movements, through clips and full-length features. We will discuss the evil-femme-fatale films of the silent days (Flesh and the Devil) and their revival in film noir; the Universal and Paramount horror movies (Frankenstein, Dracula, Island of Lost Souls); the Italian neorealism of Roberto Rossellini and Vittorio De Sica; France before the New Wave (the films of Jean Renoir and Max Ophuls); the American New Wave (The Graduate, Bonnie and Clyde, and Dog Day Afternoon), and the modern mumblecore movement (Drinking Buddies, Baghead, 28 Hotel Rooms). The course will also look at some of the earliest films and the ways they suggested the future course of cinema—the contrast between the Lumière brothers, in Europe, and their focus on everyday reality, and the early Edison films, in America, and their preoccupation with sex and violence. Students will come away from the course conversant in each movement, equipped to explore any or all of them in further depth, and with a deeper sense of the breadth and range of cinema.

All films can be rented or streamed instantly through Netflix, Amazon Prime, iTunes, Google Play Movies, or other online platforms.

Mick LaSalle, Film Critic, Hearst Newspapers

Mick LaSalle is the author of Complicated Women: Sex and Power in Pre-Code Hollywood, Dangerous Men: Pre-Code Hollywood and the Birth of the Modern Man, The Beauty of the Real: What Hollywood Can Learn from Contemporary French Actresses, and the forthcoming California in the Movies. He writes for the San Francisco Chronicle and other Hearst newspapers.
DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)