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DAN 30 — Tango for Beginners

Quarter: Winter
Day(s): Thursdays
Course Format: On-campus
Duration: 5 weeks
Date(s): Jan 17—Feb 14
Time: 7:00—8:50 pm
Drop Deadline: Jan 30
Unit: 1
Grade Restriction: No letter grade
Tuition: $315
Instructor(s): Richard Powers
Status: Open
Winter
On-campus
Thursdays
7:00—8:50 pm
Date(s)
Jan 17—Feb 14
5 weeks
Drop By
Jan 30
1 Unit
Fees
$315
Grade Restriction
No letter grade
Instructor(s):
Richard Powers
Open
Many people find today’s tango to be beautiful but overwhelming. But tango doesn’t have to be hard. This course will teach social tango in a way that makes sense, and allows you to remember what you’ve learned, and even invent your own easy variations. In this course, you will learn social tango, the easier form that you see at dance parties and weddings, and in the movies. This course will start with simple, basic steps and continue at a relaxed pace. For those who like extra flair, optional pointers will let you get a bit fancier. If you already know some tango, you will learn new footwork, figures, technique, and styling in social tango.

No dance experience is required, just a fun-loving attitude and lots of enthusiasm. If you already dance, register with a friend who doesn’t. This is a great way to introduce someone to tango.

Richard Powers, Lecturer in Dance, Stanford

Richard Powers has been researching and teaching social dance for forty years. He founded the world’s first Tango Weeks at Stanford in 1990 and has studied with many Argentine masters of tango. His emphasis is on flexible, attentive partnering, creativity, fun, developing one’s personal style, and adapting to the dancing styles of various partners. He has received the Lloyd W. Dinkelspiel Award for Distinctive Contributions to Undergraduate Education, and was selected by the centennial issue of Stanford Magazine as one of Stanford’s most notable graduates of its first century.

Textbooks for this course:

There are no required textbooks; however, some fee-based online readings may be assigned.