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WSP 108 — Opera in the Twilight of Imperial Vienna

Quarter: Winter
Day(s): Mondays
Course Format: Live Online (About Formats)
Duration: 2 days
Date(s): Jan 25—Feb 1
Time: 6:30 pm—8:30 pm (PT)
Drop Deadline: Jan 18
Unit: 0
Grade Restriction: NGR only; no credit/letter grade
Tuition: $215
Instructor(s): Speight Jenkins
Status: Registration opens Nov 30, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: Some of our refund deadlines have changed. See this course's drop deadline above and click here for the full policy.
Winter
Live Online(About Formats)
Mondays
6:30 pm—8:30 pm (PT)
Date(s)
Jan 25—Feb 1
2 days
Drop By
Jan 18
0 Unit
Fees
$215
Grade Restriction
NGR only; no credit/letter grade
Instructor(s):
Speight Jenkins
Registration opens Nov 30, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: Some of our refund deadlines have changed. See this course's drop deadline above and click here for the full policy.
Romantic Germanic opera had its last great successes in Vienna just before World War I, catching the spirit and mood of the last days of the Austrian Empire. Operettas by Johann Strauss set the stage, while operas by the transplanted Bavarian, Richard Strauss, and the Viennese Erich Korngold, celebrated the importance of realizing dreams. Richard Strauss’s most controversial works, Salome and Elektra, once banned as too shocking, reflect a fascination with the new science of psychology. Der Rosenkavalier, his most frequently performed work, is filled with music in three-quarter time and highlights the sophistication of his great Viennese librettist, Hugo von Hofmannsthal. Erich Korngold’s Die Tote Stadt (premiering in 1920), built on this tradition, moving more obviously into the world of Freud. We will sample the singers whose unique voices define these operas such as Lotte Lehmann, Ludwig Weber, Maria Reining, and Ljuba Welitsch in the mid-20th century; more recently Leonie Rysanek, Inge Borkh, Walter Berry, Christa Ludwig, Gundula Janowitz, and James King; and even much more recently, Kate Lindsey. Finally, we will consider Strauss's influence on his contemporaries such as Gustav Mahler, Alban Berg, and Igor Stravinsky.

Speight Jenkins, General Director of Seattle Opera, Emeritus

Speight Jenkins led Seattle Opera from 1983 through 2014, producing ninety-two separate operas and traveling extensively in Europe and the United States. In 1981, he became the Metropolitan Opera’s host on the nationally televised Live from the Met broadcasts. He received a JD from Columbia and honorary doctorates from Seattle University, the University of Puget Sound, and the New England Conservatory.