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ARC 13 — Medieval Art and Archaeology

Quarter: Fall
Day(s): Wednesdays
Course Format: Live Online (About Formats)
Duration: 10 weeks
Date(s): Sep 23—Dec 2
Time: 7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Drop Deadline: Sep 25
Units: 2
Tuition: $485
Instructor(s): Patrick Hunt
Status: Closed
Please Note: No class on November 25. In addition, some of our refund deadlines have changed. See this course's drop deadline above and click here for the full policy.
Fall
Live Online(About Formats)
Wednesdays
7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Date(s)
Sep 23—Dec 2
10 weeks
Drop By
Sep 25
2 Units
Fees
$485
Instructor(s):
Patrick Hunt
Closed
Please Note: No class on November 25. In addition, some of our refund deadlines have changed. See this course's drop deadline above and click here for the full policy.
The Middle Ages have been romantically revived many times over the past two hundred years, most notably by Sir Walter Scott and William Morris in Great Britain and by Eugène Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc in France. While not dismissing their portraits of the medieval period, we will look closely at the findings of recent archaeology in order to reach a nuanced assessment of what must be considered one of the most dazzling pinnacles of European cultural achievement. We will examine the treasure trove of artistic, architectural, and archaeological materials from the Middle Ages that have survived to the present day and that help to illuminate the immensely rich cultural heritage of that period. The course will move from stunningly ambitious architectural projects (cathedrals and castles) to delicate handwork (ivory carvings and jewelry, and reliquaries of gold and silver); and from sacred art (manuscript illumination) to the secular arts of war (chased armor and heraldry) and luxurious textiles (tapestries). In the so-called Age of Faith, many artists and artisans were creating for churches and seeking to evoke religious themes. Some believed their work was thus called to a higher standard; a desire to give their best to God may have deepened these artists’ dedication to their work and elevated its quality.

Patrick Hunt, Former Director, Stanford Alpine Archaeology Project; Research Associate in Archeoethnobotany, Institute of EthnoMedicine

Patrick Hunt is the author of more than twenty books and a national lecturer for the Archaeological Institute of America. He received a PhD from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. He is an explorer and expeditions expert for National Geographic, and his Alps research has been sponsored by the National Geographic Expeditions Council.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Sekules, Medieval Art (ISBN 978-0192842411)
(Required)  J. Spier, H. Kessler, S. Fine et al., Picturing the Bible: The Earliest Christian Art (ISBN 978-0300149340)
DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)