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MUS 108 — Inside Jazz

Quarter: Spring
Day(s): Mondays
Course Format: On-campus course
Duration: 5 weeks
Date(s): Apr 24—May 22
Time: 7:00—8:50 pm
Drop Deadline: May 7
Unit: 1
Tuition: $240
Instructor(s): Jim Nadel
Limit: 40
Status: Closed
Spring
On-campus course
Mondays
7:00—8:50 pm
Date(s)
Apr 24—May 22
5 weeks
Drop By
May 7
1 Unit
Fees
$240
Instructor(s):
Jim Nadel
Limit
40
Closed
Stan Getz said that the best jazz is like a conversation among good friends. The general listener, even without any musical training, can reach a deeper enjoyment of the music by better understanding some of its language and structure, and the tacit agreements that many jazz musicians use to guide their interpretations and improvisational interactions.

This course is for the general listener who wants to better understand jazz music and learn more about the inner game that jazz musicians play. Jazz is a music based on individual self-expression in the context of a musical team, and the role of each musician changes throughout any performance. By looking at musical contributions made by some of jazz’s greatest artists, including Louis Armstrong, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, and John Coltrane, we will begin to understand that there are many different yet highly successful approaches to playing jazz. Topics to be explored include the language and structure of jazz as well as the approaches to improvisation. Demonstrations and discussions are designed to help the general listener hear the music as a “fifth member of the quartet.”

Jim Nadel, Founding Director, Stanford Jazz Workshop

Jim Nadel has been at Stanford for more than forty years. He has been a lecturer in jazz studies for the Stanford Department of Music for more than thirty years. Nadel plays the saxophone professionally and is also a composer and an arranger.

Textbooks for this course:

There are no required textbooks; however, some fee-based online readings may be assigned.
DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)