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FLM 123 — Cinema’s Most Influential Movies

Quarter: Winter
Day(s): Tuesdays
Course Format: On-campus
Duration: 10 weeks
Date(s): Jan 15—Mar 19
Time: 6:30—9:00 pm
Drop Deadline: Jan 28
Units: 2
Tuition: $480
Instructor(s): Jonathan Crow
Status: Open
Please Note: This course has a different class time than what appears in the print catalogue. The course will meet from 6:30 - 9:00 pm (not 6:30 - 9:30 pm).
Winter
On-campus
Tuesdays
6:30—9:00 pm
Date(s)
Jan 15—Mar 19
10 weeks
Drop By
Jan 28
2 Units
Fees
$480
Instructor(s):
Jonathan Crow
Open
Please Note: This course has a different class time than what appears in the print catalogue. The course will meet from 6:30 - 9:00 pm (not 6:30 - 9:30 pm).
Over its 123 years of existence, cinema went from being a gimmick to becoming the major art form of the 20th century. Along the way, a handful of movies emerged that were so groundbreaking they changed cinema forever. This course will take an in-depth look at ten of these landmark films, placing each in its historical context and examining how it expanded the possibilities for visual storytelling. We will first look at directors like D.W. Griffith who perfected what we now call Hollywood’s populist style of filmmaking. We will also watch films by European directors like Sergei Eisenstein, who pushed film editing to new heights, and Robert Wiene, who helped bring the interior world of the psyche to the screen. And we will take a close look at John Ford, whose film Stagecoach not only revitalized the western, but also influenced Orson Welles and a generation of noir directors. In Italy, Vittorio De Sica’s masterpiece, Bicycle Thieves, rejected Hollywood’s fantasies to better mirror grim postwar realities, while in France, Nouvelle Vague (New Wave) filmmakers like Jean-Luc Godard exploded cinematic rules and turned the medium into modernist art. Finally, we will round out our study of innovative films that expanded the boundaries of cinema by reviewing masterpieces by Alfred Hitchcock, Akira Kurosawa, and Stanley Kubrick.

Jonathan Crow, Writer; Filmmaker

Jonathan Crow has worked in film production in Hollywood and Japan and has taught film at the University of Michigan and the New York Film Academy. He has also written about cinema for Yahoo Entertainment, The Hollywood Reporter, Open Culture, and other publications. He received an MFA in film/video from the California Institute of the Arts and an MA in Japanese studies from the University of Michigan.

Textbooks for this course:

(Recommended) Mark Cousins, The Story of Film (ISBN 978-1862059429)
DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)