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HIS 60 — Black Activists and the Fight Against Slavery

Quarter: Winter
Day(s): Tuesdays
Course Format: Live Online (About Formats)
Duration: 6 weeks
Date(s): Jan 26—Mar 2
Time: 7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Drop Deadline: Jan 28
Unit: 1
Tuition: $360
Instructor(s): Andy Hammann
Status: Registration opens Nov 30, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: Some of our refund deadlines have changed. See this course's drop deadline above and click here for the full policy.
Winter
Live Online(About Formats)
Tuesdays
7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Date(s)
Jan 26—Mar 2
6 weeks
Drop By
Jan 28
1 Unit
Fees
$360
Instructor(s):
Andy Hammann
Registration opens Nov 30, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: Some of our refund deadlines have changed. See this course's drop deadline above and click here for the full policy.
The degradation, the wrongs, the vices, that grow out of slavery, are more than I can describe. They are greater than you would willingly believe. —Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Many activists in the fight against slavery were enslaved or formerly enslaved Americans. Because they experienced firsthand slavery’s terrible and, in a sense, indescribable realities, they opposed its persistence with singular conviction and urgency. This course examines several aspects of their prolonged fight, focusing on African Americans who self-emancipated via the Underground Railroad, established clandestine (“maroon”) communities in the South, published narratives of enslavement, founded and edited antislavery newspapers, and led organizations like the American Anti-Slavery Society. We will read selections from primary sources including Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Jacobs; Narrative of the Life of Moses Grandy, by Moses Grandy; and The North Star newspaper, founded by Frederick Douglass; and we will dig into Stanford’s vast Black Abolitionist Papers online archive. We will also consider connections between the historical fight against slavery and the current Black Lives Matter movement. Students will come away from this course with deeper understanding of what it was like to fight against slavery in a society that repeatedly affirmed and defended its legality.

Andy Hammann, Lecturer, History, African and African American Studies, Stanford

Andy Hammann's research and teaching focus on the intertwined histories of slavery and racial prejudice in the United States during the 18th and 19th centuries. He is particularly interested in the construction, contestation, and evolution of racialized ideas. Hammann is at work on a book tentatively titled Black Freedom and the Nation: The Deep Roots of Exclusionary Prejudice in America. He received an MBA from Wharton and a PhD in history from Stanford.