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ARC 08 — Art, Archaeology, and Myth: Olympian Visions, Layered Meanings

Quarter: Winter
Day(s): Wednesdays
Course Format: Live Online (About Formats)
Duration: 10 weeks
Date(s): Jan 13—Mar 17
Time: 7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Drop Deadline: Jan 15
Units: 2
Tuition: $485
Instructor(s): Patrick Hunt
Status: Registration opens Nov 30, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: Some of our refund deadlines have changed. See this course's drop deadline above and click here for the full policy.
Winter
Live Online(About Formats)
Wednesdays
7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Date(s)
Jan 13—Mar 17
10 weeks
Drop By
Jan 15
2 Units
Fees
$485
Instructor(s):
Patrick Hunt
Registration opens Nov 30, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: Some of our refund deadlines have changed. See this course's drop deadline above and click here for the full policy.
Mythology has been a magnet for artists, especially mythology in Classical texts like Ovid and Homer. When the Renaissance rediscovered Classical texts, art and mythology became so richly entwined that religious art diminished and mythological art replaced much of it. Prometheus, Pandora, the Judgment of Paris, Troy, the Olympian gods, heroes like Herakles, Odysseus, and Aeneas, and monsters like Gorgons, centaurs, and sphinxes are just a few of the mythical personae painted and sculpted in Western art. Distinguishing myth and history as Herodotus did, we can ask such questions as these: who and what were the Bronze Age models of Athena and Demeter? How did Aphrodite change from her archaeological antecedent, the Mesopotamian goddess Ishtar? What meanings has the caduceus of Hermes possessed through time? Before most people could read, images and their iconographic symbolism were known and spread. We will explore how myths have been visualized in Western art, noting changes in cultural perception, conventions, and social values reflected in the ways mythology is rendered through time. We will also examine embedded archaeological evidence in the various arts depicting myth, and possible routes that myth images have taken over millennia to the modern era, providing possible ways to date the changes in the art of myth through time.

Patrick Hunt, Former Director, Stanford Alpine Archaeology Project; Research Associate, Archeoethnobotany, Institute of EthnoMedicine

Patrick Hunt is the author of twenty-three books and a national lecturer for the Archaeological Institute of America. He received a PhD from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. He is an elected Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society and the Explorers Club, and he is an explorer and expeditions expert for National Geographic. His Alps research has been sponsored by the National Geographic Expeditions Council.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Patrick Hunt, Olympian Visions: Mythology in Art (ISBN (To Be Released Mid-December))
(Required) Annette Giesecke, Classical Mythology A-Z: Encyclopedia of Gods (ISBN 978-0762470013)
DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)