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LIT 198 — Anna Karenina

Quarter: Winter
Day(s): Mondays
Course Format: Live Online (About Formats)
Duration: 8 weeks
Date(s): Jan 10—Mar 14
Time: 7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Refund Deadline: Jan 12
Unit: 1
Tuition: $410
Instructor(s): Anne Hruska
Class Recording Available: Yes
Status: Registration opens Nov 29, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: No class on January 17 and February 21
DOWNLOAD THE SYLLABUS » (subject to change)
Winter
Live Online(About Formats)
Mondays
7:00—8:50 pm (PT)
Date(s)
Jan 10—Mar 14
8 weeks
Refund Date
Jan 12
1 Unit
Fees
$410
Instructor(s):
Anne Hruska
Recording
Yes
Registration opens Nov 29, 8:30 am (PT)
Please Note: No class on January 17 and February 21
DOWNLOAD THE SYLLABUS » (subject to change)
In a famous letter to his friend Nikolai Strakhov, written while he was still working on Anna Karenina, Tolstoy described his view of literary art as a “labyrinth of linkages,” a complex network of interconnections which, he believed, was impossible to express directly: “it can be done only indirectly, by using words to describe characters, acts, situations.”

Anna Karenina reflects, in the beauty of its artistic form, the labyrinth of linkages that Tolstoy described. It is also a gripping read, involving the romantic yearnings of a number of characters, including the unhappily married Anna; her sister-in-law Dolly, who tries to find a way to live with her husband’s infidelity; and the outsider Konstantin Levin, who longs for love but seems unable to find it. The characters search for happiness in their personal lives, and in the process they either grapple with or studiously avoid the crucial question of how we are to go about living in the only world we have.

ANNE HRUSKA
English Instructor, Stanford Online High School

Anne Hruska taught for five years in Stanford’s Introduction to the Humanities program and has also taught at UC Berkeley, the University of Missouri, and the Pedagogical Institute in Saratov, Russia. She received a PhD from UC Berkeley, and her academic specialty is Russian literature.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Leo Tolstoy and Rosamund Barlett (trans.), Anna Karenina (ISBN 978-0198800538)
(Recommended) Leo Tolstoy and Aylmer Maude (trans.), A Confession (ISBN 978-0486438511)