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FLM 135 — A Weekend with Orson Welles: Five Indelible Classic Films

Quarter: Winter
Day(s): Friday - Sunday
Course Format: On-campus
Duration: 3 days
Date(s): Feb 28—Mar 1
Drop Deadline: Feb 28
Unit: 1
Grade Restriction: No letter grade
Tuition: $295
Instructor(s): Elliot Lavine
Status: Open
Please Note: Full Schedule: Friday, February 28, 6:30 – 9:00 pm, Saturday, February 29, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm, Sunday, March 1, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Winter
On-campus
Friday - Sunday
Date(s)
Feb 28—Mar 1
3 days
Drop By
Feb 28
1 Unit
Fees
$295
Grade Restriction
No letter grade
Instructor(s):
Elliot Lavine
Open
Please Note: Full Schedule: Friday, February 28, 6:30 – 9:00 pm, Saturday, February 29, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm, Sunday, March 1, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Orson Welles himself needs no introduction. Like Alfred Hitchcock, he has enjoyed a celebrity status relatively unequaled in contemporary popular culture. A genuinely larger-than-life personality, he became far better known as the jocular talk show guest or wine pitchman on television commercials than the quixotically genius film director that he had always been. What seemed to get lost in the shuffle were the films themselves.

Welles invaded Hollywood in 1940. A year later, through the movie studio RKO Pictures, he released perhaps one of the most iconic, groundbreaking films of the 20th century: Citizen Kane, a film that the twenty-five- year-old Welles starred in, co-wrote, and directed. Flush with success as well as controversy (Welles, the picture, and RKO were all the victims of newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst’s wrath over being the target of Kane’s cruel intentions), Welles suddenly found himself an outsider, and was eventually forced to leave the United States in order to secure financing for his many unfulfilled projects. Periodically, he would return to the Hollywood that had scorned him and produce one of his handful of desperately created cinematic miracles.

This course will reacquaint students with the depth and breadth of Welles’s classic work as well as provide an opportunity to participate in vigorous post-film discussions. Films to be viewed in class, in their entirety, are: Citizen Kane (1941), The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), The Lady from Shanghai (1948), Touch of Evil (1958), and The Trial (1962).

Elliot Lavine, Film Programmer; Adjunct Instructor of Film Studies, Oregon State

Elliot Lavine received the Marlon Riggs Award from the San Francisco Film Critics Circle in 2010 for his revival of rare archival titles and his role in the renewed popularity of film noir.

Textbooks for this course:

There are no required textbooks; however, some fee-based online readings may be assigned.