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ARTH 177 — Raphael: A 500th-Anniversary Celebration of a Renaissance Master

Quarter: Spring
Day(s): Wednesdays
Course Format: On-campus
Duration: 7 weeks
Date(s): Apr 1—May 13
Time: 7:00—8:50 pm
Drop Deadline: Apr 14
Unit: 1
Grade Restriction: No letter grade
Tuition: $335
Status: Open
Spring
On-campus
Wednesdays
7:00—8:50 pm
Date(s)
Apr 1—May 13
7 weeks
Drop By
Apr 14
1 Unit
Fees
$335
Grade Restriction
No letter grade
Instructor(s):
Open
Course Description:

When Raphael Sanzio, who was named for an angel, died on April 6, 1520, he was only thirty-seven years old. To his 16th-century biographers, Raphael seemed to have been touched by God. His work was so beautiful and his behavior so graceful that he provided a startlingly new paradigm for all artists. His ever-changing and enormous body of work is often taken to represent the pinnacle of the intense creativity and innovation of the High Renaissance.

As a painter, architect, and designer, Raphael was at ease with making both small Madonnas and twelve-feet-wide altarpieces, complex frescoes and distinctive portraits, precious tapestries, and the plans for St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome. Precisely because of such a great and diversified production, however, even the most dedicated scholars have struggled to explain Raphael. In the year marking the 500th anniversary of his untimely death, this course—drawing together an international team of experts—will explore this brilliant and yet little-understood painter, taking a close look at several of his masterpieces, including The School of Athens and the glorious Transfiguration altarpiece.

Schedule:

Session 1, April 1: "Raphael Transforms: from Painter to Master"
Emanuele Lugli, Assistant Professor of Art History, Stanford

Session 2, April 8: "Raphael’s School of Athens and the Intellectual Culture of Renaissance Rome"
Sarah Prodan, Assistant Professor of French and Italian, Stanford

Session 3, April 15: "Raphael's Rome: The Artist and the Renaissance City"
Paula Findlen, Ubaldo Pierotti Professor of Italian History and Co-Director of the Suppes Center for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Stanford

Session 4, April 22: "Raphael’s Transfiguration: or, Light Filtering through Trees"
Alexander Nemerov, Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities, Stanford

Session 5, April 29: "Raphael's Dream"
Marzia Faietti, Director, Department of Prints and Drawings, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

Session 6, May 6: "'Almost Breathing Likenesses:' Raphael Portraiture”
Christy Junkerman, Lecturer, Department of Art and Art History, San Jose State

Session 7, May 13: "Raphael as Architect"
Fabio Barry, Assistant Professor of Art History, Stanford


Course Instructors and Guest Speakers Include:

Fabio Barry, Assistant Professor of Art History, Stanford
Fabio Barry was originally trained as an architect. Much of his published research has concentrated on artistic production in Rome, particularly baroque architecture, treating themes from liturgy to light metaphysics.

Marzia Faietti, Director, Department of Prints and Drawings, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
Marzia Faietti, a specialist in Italian Renaissance drawings, has curated many exhibitions and contributed to many exhibition catalogues. She is the author, most recently, of The Power of Line.

Paula Findlen, Ubaldo Pierotti Professor of Italian History and Co-Director of the Suppes Center for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Stanford
Paula Findlen’s many publications include essays in the catalogue for the 2019 “Leonardo’s Library: The World of a Renaissance Reader” exhibition at the Stanford Green Library. She received the Galilei Prize in 2016 and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Christy Junkerman, Lecturer, Department of Art and Art History, San Jose State
Christy Junkerman, a specialist in Italian Renaissance art, has taught several courses for Stanford Continuing Studies. Her research interests include the history of portraiture in the Renaissance.

Emanuele Lugli, Assistant Professor of Art History, Stanford
Emanuele Lugli teaches and writes about late medieval and early modern art. He is the author of two monographs, The Making of Measure and the Promise of Sameness and Unità di Misura: Breve Storia del Metro in Italia.

Alexander Nemerov, Carl and Marilynn Thoma Provostial Professor in the Arts and Humanities, Stanford
Alexander Nemerov is chair of the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford, and has been voted one of the university’s top ten professors by The Stanford Daily. In 2017, he presented the Sixty-Sixth A.W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts at the National Gallery of Art. His most recent books, among many publications, are Soulmaker: The Times of Lewis Hine and Summoning Pearl Harbor.

Sarah Prodan, Assistant Professor of French and Italian, Stanford
Sarah Prodan is a Michelangelo specialist and a scholar of early modern Italian literature and culture. Her first book, Michelangelo’s Christian Mysticism: Spirituality, Poetry, and Art in Sixteenth-Century Italy, received an Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Publication Award from the Modern Language Association.

The fifth class session on April 29 will be offered as a public program, and class will be opened to the general public on this date only. Please note: Since the fifth session is a free public program, the course's tuition has been lowered accordingly and students will not be charged for this session.

DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)