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FLM 14 — Scorsese and De Niro: A Cinematic Collaboration

Quarter: Summer
Day(s): Fri/Sat/Sun
Course Format: On-campus
Duration: 3 days
Date(s): Jul 26—Jul 28
Drop Deadline: Jul 26
Unit: 1
Grade Restriction: No letter grade
Tuition: $295
Instructor(s): Elliot Lavine
Status: Open
Please Note: Course schedule: Friday, July 26, 6:30 - 9:30 pm; Saturday, July 27, 10:00 am - 5:00 pm; Sunday, July 28, 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Summer
On-campus
Fri/Sat/Sun
Date(s)
Jul 26—Jul 28
3 days
Drop By
Jul 26
1 Unit
Fees
$295
Grade Restriction
No letter grade
Instructor(s):
Elliot Lavine
Open
Please Note: Course schedule: Friday, July 26, 6:30 - 9:30 pm; Saturday, July 27, 10:00 am - 5:00 pm; Sunday, July 28, 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
One of the most highly anticipated films of 2019 is a true-crime drama from director Martin Scorsese called The Irishman and starring Robert De Niro, making it the ninth time these two singularly important film artists have collaborated. From the very beginning (Mean Streets, 1973), this colossal marriage of talent served to create some of the most explosively provocative film entertainment of the second half of the 20th century.

In a life dedicated to the creation and preservation of cinema, Martin Scorsese has managed to mingle his passion for film with a raft of serious themes not ordinarily associated with the type of incendiary films he makes—themes of faith, guilt, and spiritual redemption, to name but a few of the critical concerns his films consistently address. External matters such as sex, violence, and the collision between family and crime enter the mix just as feverishly.

In this intensive three-day film survey, we will watch, discuss, and analyze five film collaborations between Scorsese and his most dynamic muse, De Niro, from their most fruitful period (1973–90). These classic collaborations include Goodfellas, Mean Streets, Raging Bull, Taxi Driver, and The King of Comedy. Each film confronts the harsh realities of life in America, yet ultimately views with benevolence the outcasts and misfits who populate Scorsese’s thrilling explorations into the frailties of the human condition.

Elliot Lavine, Film Programmer

Elliot Lavine is an adjunct instructor of film studies at Oregon State University. In 2010, he received the Marlon Riggs Award from the San Francisco Film Critics Circle for his revival of rare archival titles and his role in the renewed popularity of film noir.