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CLS 88 — The Genius of Leonardo da Vinci: A 500th Anniversary Celebration

Quarter: Spring
Day(s): Tuesdays
Course Format: On-campus
Duration: 8 weeks
Date(s): Apr 16—Jun 4
Time: 7:00—8:50 pm
Drop Deadline: Apr 29
Unit: 1
Grade Restriction: No letter grade
Tuition: $365
Status: Registration opens Feb 25 8:30 am (PT)
Spring
On-campus
Tuesdays
7:00—8:50 pm
Date(s)
Apr 16—Jun 4
8 weeks
Drop By
Apr 29
1 Unit
Fees
$365
Grade Restriction
No letter grade
Instructor(s):
Registration opens Feb 25 8:30 am (PT)
Course Description:

Leonardo da Vinci, who died on May 2, 1519, observed the world around him—“all the manifest works of nature,” as he put it—with boundless curiosity and inexhaustible patience. In a few famous paintings and in thousands of pages of notes and drawings, he left a body of work of stunning range. His effort was not just to look at the natural world as a painter might, but also to seek to understand how nature worked, what caused things to be the way they were. Although his interests belonged to his society, his curiosity was seemingly unlimited, and his expression of this curiosity about how to make connections between things was his own. He studied anatomy, the growth of plants, hydraulics, geology, mathematics, mechanics, and the flight of birds. He designed architecture, machines and weapons of war, played music, and made maps. He redefined painting and drawing as a science and strove to make them capable of communicating what he had learned. This course commemorates the 500th anniversary of Leonardo’s death, bringing together a group of scholars from several disciplines—history, music, art history, and the history of science—to address the work of a great and endlessly fascinating mind.

This course commemorates the 500th anniversary of Leonardo’s death, bringing together a group of scholars from several disciplines—history, music, art history, and the history of science—to address the work of a great and endlessly fascinating mind.

Schedule:

Session 1, April 16: "Leonardo's Training in Florence"
Emanuele Lugli, Assistant Professor of Art History, Stanford

Session 2, April 23: “Leonardo and the Challenge of the Portrait”
Christy Junkerman, Lecturer, Department of Art and Art History, San Jose State

Session 3, April 30: “Leonardo da Vinci and Church Architecture”
Fabio Barry, Assistant Professor of Art History, Stanford

Session 4, May 7: “’Homo sanza numeri:’ Leonardo and the World of Renaissance Mathematics”
Federica Favino, Research Fellow and Lecturer in History of Science, La Sapienza University of Rome

Session 5, May 14: "The Signs of Time: Leonardo da Vinci's History of the Earth and the Fate of Man"
Paolo Galluzzi, Director, Museo Galileo, Florence

Session 6, May 21: “Bodies and Machines: Leonardo's Anatomy and Engineering”
Paula Findlen, Ubaldo Pierotti Professor of Italian History, Director of the Suppes Center for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Stanford

Session 7, May 28: “Science of Music in the Age of Leonardo”
Jesse Rodin, Associate Professor (Musicology), Stanford

Session 8, June 4: “Leonardo and Perception”
Jonathan Berger, Denning Family Provostial Professor in Music, Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA); William R. and Gretchen B. Kimball University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, Stanford

Course Instructors and Guest Speakers Include:

Fabio Barry, Assistant Professor of Art History, Stanford
Fabio Barry was originally trained as an architect. Much of his published research has concentrated on artistic production in Rome, particularly baroque architecture, treating themes from liturgy to light metaphysics.

Jonathan Berger, Denning Family Provostial Professor in Music, Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA); William R. and Gretchen B. Kimball University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, Stanford
Jonathan Berger is a composer whose compositions are often inspired by science and the human condition. He has received commissions from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Mellon and Rockefeller foundations, and Chamber Music America.

Paula Findlen, Ubaldo Pierotti Professor of Italian History, Director of the Suppes Center for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, Stanford

Paula Findlen’s many publications include Leonardo’s Library: The World of a Renaissance Reader (2019), which will inaugurate an exhibition on Leonardo in Stanford’s Green Library opening in May 2019. She received the Galilei Prize in 2016 and is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Federica Favino, Research Fellow and Lecturer in History of Science, La Sapienza University of Rome
Federica Favino’s research focuses on Giovanni Battista Ciampoli (1589–1643), papal secretary and disciple of Galileo. She received a PhD in history from the University of Naples.

Paolo Galluzzi, Director, Museo Galileo, Florence
Paolo Galluzzi is chairman of the commission for the National Edition of the Manuscripts and Drawings by Leonardo da Vinci. He is an Italian historian of science and an internationally recognized scholar of Leonardo’s science and engineering.

Christy Junkerman, Lecturer, Department of Art and Art History, San Jose State
Christy Junkerman teaches Italian Renaissance art at San Jose State and has taught at UC Berkeley and Stanford Continuing Studies. Her research interests include the history of portraiture in the Renaissance.

Emanuele Lugli, Assistant Professor of Art History, Stanford
Emanuele Lugli teaches and writes about late medieval and early modern art. He is the author of two monographs, including The Making of Measure and the Promise of Sameness.

Jesse Rodin, Associate Professor (Musicology), Stanford
Jesse Rodin’s work focuses on the 15th century and strives to make contact with lived musical experiences of the distant past. He is the author of Josquin’s Rome: Hearing and Composing in the Sistine Chapel.

The fifth class session on May 14 will be offered as a public program, and class will be opened to the general public on this date only. (More information can be found here). Please note: Since the fifth session is a free public program, the course's tuition has been lowered accordingly and students will not be charged for this session.

Textbooks for this course:

(Required) Leonardo da Vinci, Notebooks (Oxford University Press, 2008) (ISBN 9780199299027)
(Required) Martin Kemp, Leonardo (Oxford University Press, Revised Edition, 2008) (ISBN 9780199583355)
DOWNLOAD THE PRELIMINARY SYLLABUS » (subject to change)